March 2021

President’s Message

Dear Compatriots,

Orange County is very close to getting promoted to the COVID red tier. Restaurants may reopen indoor dining areas, and several other sectors including gyms and movie theaters are permitted to reopen for indoor operations.   The significance to our chapter is at long last we may be able to meet as a group in April or May. Hope all of you are healthy and have remained safe throughout this ordeal. My wife and I have had the first vaccine shot and are due to get the booster the 2nd week of March.

In looking at significant events that happened in March during the American Revolution the Boston Massacre occurred on March 5, 1770 (251 years ago).  A small British army detachment that was threatened by mob harassment opened fire and killed five people, an incident soon known as the Boston Massacre. The soldiers were charged with murder and were given a civilian trial, in which John Adams conducted a successful defense.  The Boston Massacre helped spark the colonists’ desire for American independence, while the dead rioters became martyrs for liberty.

This month the chapter is still refraining from social gathering which means that the monthly chapter meeting will once again be virtual using the Zoom app on Tuesday, March 16th at 7pm.  As in prior months it is my hope that you can find the time to connect to the virtual meeting.  It’s important that we try to maintain synergy as a chapter as we work through the restrictions on meeting in person.  Let’s keep doing our part to promote American patriotism.

Stay safe and stay healthy my fellow compatriots.

In patriotism,

R. Scott Whitman

March 16 Chapter Zoom Meeting

Tuesday, March 16 at 7:00 PM

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic we will be conducting our monthly meetings using Zoom teleconferencing for a while.  Our next meeting is on the third Tuesday, March 16 at 7:00 PM. 

Members will be emailed a meeting link, meeting ID and passcode.


The Stamp Act of 1765

The Stamp Act, passed by the British Parliament on March 22, 1765, was one of the major events that triggered the American Revolution.  It required the American colonists to purchase and affix official tax stamps to all sorts of printed materials such as newspapers, magazines and legal documents.

The reason that this tax was imposed by the British is that they felt that the American colonists should share in the expenses from the French and Indian War, fought in 1754 through 1763, that pitted the French and their American Indian allies against the Colonists with significant assistance from the British Army.  The British felt that this tax was justified because of the benefits the colonists received from the blood and treasure they expended (which was decisive in the victory), however, the colonists did not agree.  They felt that they had already paid their share of the war’s expenses.

The Stamp Act was very unpopular among colonists. A majority considered it a violation of their rights as Englishmen to be taxed without their consent—consent that only the colonial legislatures could grant. The colonists believed that the tax imposed by the British was unfair since they had no representatives in the British Parliament and had no say in the nature and amount of the taxes.  This they referred to as “taxation without representation” which became one of the rallying calls of the Revolution ten years hence.  One of the more onerous provisions of the Stamp Act was the requirement that the tax be paid with British money and not colonial paper money.

The reaction of the colonists to the Stamp Act was immediate.  Many refused to pay the tax.  Protests and demonstrations increased.  The tax collectors were hung in effigy, threatened and/or forced to resign from their jobs.  The stamped paper was burned in the streets and British products and merchants were boycotted.  The tax was really never effectively collected. 

Local protest groups established Committees of Correspondence which created a loose coalition from New England to Maryland.  So strong were the feelings against the Stamp Act that a meeting of all of the colonies was called and named the Stamp Act Congress.  It was held in New York City from October 7 to October 25, 1765 and drafted a formal protest of the Stamp Act which was sent to Britain.

The events of this era gave rise to groups of Americans known as Sons of Liberty who protested against the taxes, intimidated the tax collectors, and eventually became driving forces in the American Revolution.

Opposition to the Stamp Act was not limited to the colonies. British merchants and manufacturers pressured Parliament because their exports to the colonies were threatened by boycotts.  Parliament responded to business interests by repealing the Stamp Act on March 18, 1766.  They realized that the Stamp Act was a mistake but they still felt a need to assert their authority to tax the colonies.  On that same day they passed the Declaratory Act in which they declared Parliament’s right to levy taxes and make laws in the colonies.  A series of new taxes and regulations then ensued—likewise opposed by the Americans. This included the Tea Tax which led to the Boston Tea Party.  The Declaratory Act played a major role in defining the 27 colonial grievances that were clearly stated within the text of the Indictment of George III section of the Declaration of Independence, enabling the organized colonial resistance which led to the American Revolution. 


“Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death!”

Patrick Henry, March 23, 1775

Patrick Henry’s legacy has become indelibly linked with his oration to the Second Virginia Convention where he proclaimed, “Give me liberty or give me death.” However, Henry did not just give one speech and was not merely an unwavering patriot, Henry was a skilled politician, lawyer, and orator. 

He was originally elected to Virginia’s House of Burgesses in 1765 and he traveled to Williamsburg where the Burgesses were already in session and debating the Stamp Act.  When the Act passed, the burgeoning politician introduced the Stamp Act Resolves. The “Resolves” established that Virginian colonists had the same rights as British citizens and that taxation without representation is tyranny. During this session, Henry also gave an impassioned speech arguing against the Stamp Act. During the speech, the not so tactful orator carefully referenced how tyrants were murdered, never actually mentioning King George; however, the room read his tone, and many decried his statement as treason. Henry famously replied, “If this be treason, make the most of it.”

Henry attended the Virginia Conventions from 1774-1776; these meetings set out a plan for the colony of Virginia and were crucial for the nation’s independence. Utilizing committees of correspondence, the rising Virginian contacted John and Samuel Adams, and together they decided to push their respective colonies to independence. Henry’s defining moment came in the Second Virginia Convention—when he delivered his now famous “Give me Liberty or give me death!” speech. Many future patriots were in the audience, including Thomas Jefferson and George Washington. The address helped drive prominent Virginians to prepare for war. No one in the audience recorded the speech, and later historians pieced the speech together, it is unclear if Henry actually concluded with the famous quote or if that was invented years later to sell books. 

February 2021

Presidents’s Message

Dear Compatriots,

I sincerely hope this message finds that you all are safe and not adversely impacted by the COVID.  As for myself I am in the virtual waiting room to get my COVID vaccine.  The chapter still needs to refrain from social gathering so once again we will hold a Zoom chapter meeting on Tuesday, February 16th.  Hope you can find the time to connect to the virtual meeting.  For the dinner “speaker” part of the meeting agenda we have been showing short YouTube videos that have American Revolution significance.

We start off this month with a new POTUS and are in anticipation of how our lives will be impacted by the new administration.  Now more than ever we need organizations like the Sons of the American Revolution to keep promoting patriotism, preserving American history, and teaching American history to future generations.  Truly hard to believe that the San Francisco Board of Education voted last month to remove the names of George Washington, Abraham Lincoln and other iconic Americans from the city’s public schools. 

On February 15th we honor President’s Day.  Abraham Lincoln’s birthday is on February 12th and George Washington’s birthday is on February 22nd.  Let’s take a moment out of our busy lives to reflect on the contributions of these great men.  In its modern form, Presidents’ Day is used by many patriotic and historical groups as a date for staging celebrations, reenactments and other events. A number of states also require that their public schools spend the days leading up to Presidents’ Day teaching students about the accomplishments of the presidents, often with a focus on the lives of Washington and Lincoln.

This month our Color Guard would normally be supporting the Massing of the Colors event at Forest Lawn cemetery in Los Angeles.  Sadly, the event is canceled due to the pandemic.   Looking forward to when we will be able to march again.  

Praying that you all remain safe and stay healthy.   

In patriotism,

R. Scott Whitman


February 16 Chapter Zoom Meeting

Tuesday, February 16 at 7:00 PM

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic we will be conducting our monthly meetings using Zoom teleconferencing for a while.  Our next meeting is on the third Tuesday, February 16 at 7:00 PM. 

Members will be emailed a meeting link, meeting ID and passcode.


Upcoming Dates and Events.

Lincoln’s Birthday – Friday, February 12:  Abraham Lincoln was the 16th President of the United States.  His birthday is observed on Presidents Day, Monday, February 15.

Valentine’s Day – Sunday, February 14:  Remember the flowers, cards, etc. for your loved ones.

Massing of the Colors & Salute to Our Armed Forces – Canceled this year.  Usually held at Hall of Liberty, Forest Lawn Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles. 

President’s Day – Monday, February 15:  This day is set aside to honor George Washington and Abraham Lincoln plus all of our former Presidents.

Chapter Zoom Meeting – Tuesday, February 16

George Washington’s Birthday – Monday, February 22ndOn this day let’s remember the life and work of George Washington, the first president of the United States.  His birthday is observed on Presidents Day, Monday, February 15.

Genealogy BASH – Saturday, March 6: The Orange County California Genealogy Society is having a virtual genealogy seminar on Saturday, March 6 from 11:00 A.M. to 4:30 P.M.  (The Book Faire is canceled this year.)  The guest speaker is forensic investigator and research expert Michael L. Strauss, AG.  Topics covered will be: (1) Women’s Suffrage: Their Rights, Roles, & Limitations; (2) Reconstructing the Past: Dealing with Military Record Loss; (3) Influenza: The Twentieth Century’s Deadliest Pandemic; and (4) Decoding Secret Societies: Researching your Fraternal Ancestors.

There is a fee to attend the virtual seminar.  Visit OCCGS website for details: https://www.occgs.com .

Dinner (Zoom) Meeting – Tuesday, March 16: Likely another virtual meeting due to COVID pandemic.


SAR PRS Progress:

The Patriot Research System (PRS) has become a useful tool for recruiting new members; we have connected 100% of our current (1985-Jul 2020) membership to their patriot and transcribed 69.4% of the applications for the same group.

PRS Chairman’s List – Most applications transcribed by society (+/- sign shows change from last month)

  1. Texas                      7872 + 367
  2. California              6575 + 955
  3. Florida                   5862 + 316
  4. Ohio                       5406 + 478
  5. Georgia                  4348 + 742
  6. North Carolina     3629 –      1
  7. Virginia                  3542 + 288
  8. Pennsylvania        3532 + 449
  9. South Carolina     2789 –      1
  10. Indiana                   2681
  11. Arizona                   2348 +     4
  12. Maryland               2318

January 2021

President’s Message

Dear Compatriots,

Thank you all for renewing your membership in this worthy organization.  We are 60 members strong.  We started out in 2020 with 55 members.  Hope you all were able to enjoy the holiday with family and friends in spite of the continued restrictions on social gathering.  This coming year promises to be better now that the vaccine is becoming available.  I hope and pray that none of you have contracted the COVID. 

The presidential election is behind us.  Some are sad and some are happy.  Either way we are so blessed to live in this great country and be a part of its democratic society.  Imagine that the Constitution was ratified up 232 years ago and is still relevant today.  Our forefathers had great vision and foresight. 

The chapter Color Guard was able to participate in the Wreaths Across America event held at El Toro Memorial Park.  There was no public ceremony due to the pandemic but we were able to place wreaths on the grave sites of the veterans who are buried there.  Several people came up to us and asked about our organization and wanted to get pictures with us in our uniforms.

Due to the continuing pandemic the chapter meeting in January will be another Zoom meeting.  The “speaker” will be another short video on a Revolutionary War topic.  Please try and set this time aside and join us in our virtual meeting.  Let me know if you have any issues with connecting to the Zoom meeting and I’ll come to you and help you set it up.    

Sadly for the chapter, our long time Registrar, Leon Smith, has decided to step down due to health reasons.  Leon has devoted 17 years to supporting this critical chapter position.  All of you have interfaced with Leon as you worked through the SAR application process and have been the beneficiary of his stellar assistance.  We thank him greatly for this service and volunteerism.  Leon also marched in the chapter Color Guard for 15 years.  This means that we are need of a volunteer to fill the chapter registrar position.  If you have an interest in genealogy and feel a calling to support the chapter in a greater capacity then please consider filling this opening.  

Wishing you all remain safe and stay healthy this coming year.  Looking forward to the time when we can meet again as a group.   

In patriotism,

R. Scott Whitman


South Coast SAR Monthly Meeting

7:00 PM, Tuesday, January 19, 2021

Zoom Video Conference Instructions

We will be using the Zoom Videoconferencing application for the South Coast SAR Monthly Meeting

Members will be emailed a meeting link, meeting ID and passcode.


Upcoming Dates and Events.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day – Monday, January 18:  This is the day for official observance this year.  His actual birthday is January 15.

January Dinner Meeting-Tuesday, January 19:  See Page 1 for details.

Revolutionary War Reenactment – From hbhistory.org website: Canceled for 2021 due to COVID-19.

https://www.hbhistory.org/revolution.

Lincoln’s Birthday – Friday, February 12:  Abraham Lincoln was the 16th President of the United States.  His birthday is observed on Presidents Day, Monday, February 15.

Valentine’s Day – Sunday, February 14:  Remember the flowers, cards, etc. for your loved ones.

Massing of the Colors & Salute to Our Armed Forces – Apparently canceled this year.  Usually held at Hall of Liberty, Forest Lawn Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles. 

For further details go to the Sons of Liberty Chapter website at:  http://www.sons-of-liberty-sar.org/massing-of-the-colors/

President’s Day – Monday, February 15:  This day is set aside to honor George Washington and Abraham Lincoln plus all of our former Presidents.

Dinner (Zoom) Meeting – Tuesday, February 16

George Washington’s Birthday – Saturday, February 22ndOn this day let’s remember the life and work of George Washington, the first president of the United States.  His birthday is observed on Presidents Day, Monday, February 15.

November 2020

President’s Message

Dear Compatriots,

Again, I hope all is well with you and yours.  As I compose this month’s President’s message the outcome of the Presidential election is unknown.  Thanks to our patriot ancestors we are blessed to live in a country where one is free to express one’s beliefs without fear of repression. 

Due to the continuing pandemic the chapter meeting in November will be another Zoom meeting.  Please try and set this time aside and join us in our virtual meeting.  At the October meeting we showed Part 1 of a video made by the SAR French Society which relates the involvement of France in the American Revolution.  We had improved attendance and hope more of you can participate at this month’s virtual meeting.  

This month the chapter would normally hold an election of officers to serve on the Board for 2021-22.  Also, due the pandemic, the Board decided to follow the lead of the NSSAR, not hold an election and have the current elected officers continue to serve in their present role until December 2021.   

On November 11th our nation celebrates Veteran’s Day.  Let’s all reflect on the importance and contribution of our veterans in protecting the freedoms we enjoy as a country.  The USA is constantly under attack by its enemies.  Thankfully, our Armed Forces are there to keep the enemy at bay.  

This month we also celebrate Thanksgiving.  This year the family gatherings will likely be different due to the pandemic but still a time to give thanks for family, friends and country.  As a descendant of one of the passengers on Mayflower the holiday has an extra special meaning.   

The November 17th chapter virtual meeting is the last meeting for 2020.  Wishing you all remain safe, stay healthy and enjoy the holiday season as best we can with the restrictions on social gathering.  Please pray for an end to the pandemic and a resumption of a near normal life in 2021.  

Please stay safe everyone. 

In patriotism,

R. Scott Whitman


South Coast SAR Monthly Meeting

7:00 PM, Tuesday, November 17, 2020

Zoom Video Conference Instructions

We will be using the Zoom Videoconferencing application for the South Coast SAR Monthly Meeting

Members will be emailed a meeting link, meeting ID and passcode.


State and National SAR News

November 13-14, 2020:  The 145th Fall CASSAR Fall Board of Managers meeting planned for Rohnert Park, CA has now been canceled.  The California Society will hold a Zoom virtual Board of Managers meeting on Saturday, November 14, 2020, beginning at 9:00 AM Pacific Time.

Upcoming Dates and Events.

Veterans Day – Wednesday, November 11:  National holiday established by President Woodrow Wilson in 1919 to commemorate the armistice that ended World War 1 on November 11, 1918.

November Zoom Meeting – Tuesday, November 17:  See Page 1 for details

Thanksgiving Day – Thurs, November 26:  Wishing everyone a safe and Happy Thanksgiving.  We are grateful for the many blessings that we have as Americans.

Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day – Monday, December 7th: Let’s remember and honor those who lost their lives on December 7th, 1941.

Christmas Day – Friday, December 25th. Wishing everyone a Merry Christmas.  Please remember our servicemen and women who cannot be home because they are defending our country.

New Year’s Day- Friday, January 1st:  Wishing everyone a Happy New Year.

January Dinner (or Zoom) Meeting – Tuesday, January 19, 2021.

Washington Crossing the Delaware

Here are 10 facts about General George Washington and the Continental Army’s famous crossing of the Delaware River on December 25-26, 1776

(From mountvernon.org)

  1. Washington crossed the Delaware River so that his army could attack an isolated garrison of Hessian troops located at Trenton, New Jersey.
  2. Washington’s attack plan included three separate river crossings, but only one made it across.
  3. Spies and deserters had informed the British and Hessians that Trenton was likely to be attacked.
  4. Washington’s force used a collection of cargo boats and ferries to transport his men across the Delaware.
  5. Experienced watermen from New England and the Philadelphia area ably guided the boats across the challenging river.
  6. The crossing was made worse by the arrival of a strong storm that brought freezing rain, snow, and terrifying winds.
  7. Washington’s carefully planned timetable was woefully behind schedule and Washington contemplated canceling the attack.
  8. The Continentals brought a great quantity of artillery across the river.
  9. The Delaware River is less than 300 yards wide at the point where the army crossed.
  10. One of the most famous American paintings shows Washington and his army crossing the Delaware River.
Washngton Crossing the Delaware

Emanuel Leutze (American, Schwäbisch Gmünd 1816–1868 Washington, D.C.)

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York